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06/18/2019 03 hours
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Eads Bridge
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Eads Bridge
 
The Eads Bridge
The Eads Bridge
As Karen M. Goering once wrote, "During its near hundred-year reign as St. Louis' chief symbol - and more recently as the city's most visible connection with its rich past - the Eads Bridge has inspired an outpouring of creative work from artists, illustrators and photographers." Originally published in 1979, The Eads Bridge, by Quinta Scott and Howard S. Miller, is a powerful example of the bridge's hold on St. Louis's civic and artistic imagination. Scott's photographic essay explores the Eads Bridge as art and architecture in a series of beautiful renderings of its confident lines, spidery supports, gracefully bulky details, and unexpected interior spaces. The historical appraisal of the bridge by historian Howard S. Miller is as much the story of the personalities of the Mississippi River and James Eads as of the bridge itself. Miller's essay presents the bridge as an avenue to Gilded Age corruption, railroad monopolies, and robber barons and into the mind of Eads himself, a complex and forceful personality in his own right. Eads's tenacity - and his "sustaining faith that glorified natural phenomena as it celebrated man's ability to comprehend and control them" - propelled the bridge he designed into virgin lands of metallurgy and engineering. Technically specific yet clearly explained, Miller's description of the construction process is fascinating reading that presents a refreshingly in-depth perspective on the landmark St. Louisans know so well.

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Road To The Sea: The Story of James B. Eads and the Mississippi River
Road To The Sea: The Story of James B. Eads and the Mississippi River
The Mississippi was discovered by Marquette in 1673 and spanned by James B. Eads in 1874. In his prolific career as an inventor intimately linked to the Mississippi, Eads founded diving salvage companies, designed turrets for Civil War ironclad ships, and-perhaps most spectacularly-built the first bridge that connected the eastern and western halves of the country, previously divided by the Great River. Compiled from the voluminous writings and utterances of James B. Eads, from government documents relating to his projects and the many controversies over them, and from magazine and newspaper accounts of his professional and social activities, among other sources, Road to the Sea is the definitive work on James B. Eads and his amazing accomplishments.

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$39.37
-$0.63(-2%)



Rails across the Mississippi: A HISTORY OF THE ST. LOUIS BRIDGE
Rails across the Mississippi: A HISTORY OF THE ST. LOUIS BRIDGE
An absorbing tale of grand dreams, shady politics, daring engineering experiments, greed, ambition, and westward expansion, Rails across the Mississippi is the first book-length history since 1881 to document the planning, financing, and construction of the first bridge across the Mississippi River at St. Louis, a national engineering landmark completed in 1874 that is now known as the Eads Bridge. Robert W. Jackson takes a fresh look at this monumental project, dispersing the myths and filling in the gaps left by earlier scholarship. When James B. Eads outlined his plan for a bridge over the Mississippi River at St. Louis, critics said that the genius did not exist in the country capable of erecting such a structure. Instead of the tried-and-true iron truss bridge, Eads--who was not a trained engineer and had no experience designing or building bridges--proposed a radical design that shattered engineering precedent: an arch bridge longer than any in existence using steel, a material thought unsuitable for long-span bridges by virtually every engineer in America and Europe. Rails across the Mississippi explores how Eads took on the task of building the bridge as he envisioned it and how he met the obstacles presented by his tenacious fidelity to that vision. Jackson describes the incredible process of sinking the river piers using pneumatic caissons, which were essentially inverted boxes that burrowed down through the riverbed. Workers, sometimes fatally afflicted with "caisson disease," or decompression sickness, descended through the vertical, torchlit access shafts into the caisson air chambers to clear away the accumulated sand and silt, using innovative pumps designed by Eads. The superstructure, consisting of an upper deck for pedestrian, wagon, and streetcar traffic and a lower railroad deck, was erected by use of an ingenious new method of cantilever construction. Parallel to the construction of the bridge, Andrew Carnegie and other ambitious capitalists engaged in a shell game of bond sales, multiple mortgages, and deferred interest that provided just enough capital to keep the project moving forward. Jackson brilliantly depicts the slick local politicking, international negotiations, and egregious conflicts of interest that were the hallmark of the Gilded Age of unregulated business. A marvel of innovative engineering, the bridge was a fiasco as a business venture. Its success as an investment depended on its heavy use by railroads, which required not only a commitment from railroads terminating in St. Louis and East St. Louis but also the construction of a mile-long tunnel under downtown St. Louis, passenger and freight terminal facilities, and tracks connecting the bridge to these facilities. Completed three years late and more than $6 million over budget, the St. Louis Bridge never recovered its costs. Nonetheless, Eads's bridge still stands at the gateway to the West, a testament to the determination and resourcefulness of its chief engineer.

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Buyenlarge The Eads Bridge Paper Poster, 18" x 27"
Buyenlarge The Eads Bridge Paper Poster, 18" x 27"
High quality vintage art reproduction by Buyenlarge. One of many rare and wonderful images brought forward in time. I hope they bring you pleasure each and every time you look at them.

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$24.50



Marine Accident Report: Ramming of the Eads Bridge by Barges in Tow of the M/W Anne Holly With Subsequent Ramming and Near Breakaway of the President ... St. Louis Harbor, Missouri April 4, 1998
Marine Accident Report: Ramming of the Eads Bridge by Barges in Tow of the M/W Anne Holly With Subsequent Ramming and Near Breakaway of the President ... St. Louis Harbor, Missouri April 4, 1998
On April 4, 1998, a tow of the M/V Anne Holly, which was traveling northbound on the Mississippi River through the St. Louis Harbor, struck the Missouri-side pier of the center span of the Eads Bridge. Eight barges broke away and drifted back through the Missouri span. Three of these barges drifted toward the President Casino on the Admiral (Admiral), a permanently moored gaming vessel below the bridge on the Missouri side of the river. The drifting barges struck the moored Admiral, causing most of its mooring lines to break. The Admiral then rotated away from the Missouri riverbank. The captain of the Anne Holly disengaged his vessel from the remaining barges in the tow and placed the Anne Holly’s bow against the Admiral’s bow to hold it against the bank. No deaths resulted from the accident; 50 people were examined for minor injuries. Of those examined, 16 were sent to local hospitals for further treatment.

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$15.99



Ramming of the Eads Bridge by Barges In Tow of the M/V Anne Holly With Subsequent Ramming and Near Breakaway of the President Casino on the Admiral ... 1998: Marine Accident Report NTSB/MAR-00/01
Ramming of the Eads Bridge by Barges In Tow of the M/V Anne Holly With Subsequent Ramming and Near Breakaway of the President Casino on the Admiral ... 1998: Marine Accident Report NTSB/MAR-00/01
On April 4, 1998, a tow of the M/V Anne Holly, which was traveling northbound on the Mississippi River through the St. Louis Harbor, struck the Missouri-side pier of the center span of the Eads Bridge. Eight barges broke away and drifted back through the Missouri span. Three of these barges drifted toward the President Casino on the Admiral, a permanently moored gaming vessel below the bridge on the Missouri side of the river. The safety issues discussed in the report are: the advisability of the Anne Holly captain's decision to make the upriver transit and the effectiveness of safety management oversight on the part of American Milling, L.P.; the effectiveness of safety measures provided for the permanently moored vessel President Casino on the Admiral; and the adequacy of public safety for permanently moored vessels. NTSB's recommendations to the USCG, the Research and Special Programs Administration, the States of Missouri and Illinois, the cities of St. Louis and East St. Louis, the National league of Cities, the American Association of Port Authorities, the American Gas Association, the American Public Gas Association, President Casino, Inc., Laclede Gas Company, and American Milling, L.P. are included.

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$17.99



St. Louis Historic Black & White Photo, High Water at the Eads Bridge, c1892
St. Louis Historic Black & White Photo, High Water at the Eads Bridge, c1892
St. Louis Historic Black & White Photo, High Water at the Eads Bridge, c1892

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$29.99



The Beauty of Railroad Bridges in North America: Then and Now
The Beauty of Railroad Bridges in North America: Then and Now
8 1/2 x 11 - Hardbound, 208 pages, 300 illustrations, plans, bibliography, and index. "The story of railroad bridges, in the United States and Canada, is also a part of the history of the development of railroads in North America. This book describes in word and picture the various types of railroad bridges such as stone viaducts, suspension bridges, wood and steel truss bridges, steel girder bridges, concrete bridges, and swing, bascule, and vertical lift bridges. This volume is ideal for the model railroader who is looking for a variety of bridges for his layout."

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$53.89



Eads Bridge in St. Louis, Missouri Journal: 150 page lined notebook/diary
Eads Bridge in St. Louis, Missouri Journal: 150 page lined notebook/diary
A life worth living is worth recording, and what better place than this journal? These lined pages crave your scribbled notes, thoughts, ideas, experiences, and notions. Fill the lines, remember your life, don't lose your ideas, and keep reaching higher to live the best life you can. It all starts here, folks, but you'll need your own pen or pencil. Write on!

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$9.99



ArtEdge EADS Bridge, Streetcars, St. Louis, Missouri Black Framed Wall Art Print, 18x24 in
ArtEdge EADS Bridge, Streetcars, St. Louis, Missouri Black Framed Wall Art Print, 18x24 in
From prints to exclusive works, the perfect frame can elevate any piece and any space. Choose from a variety of colors and sizes with ArtEdge's selection of frames. Using the finest materials, our framing craftsmen will create your piece from scratch once you've placed your order. Arrives ready to hang with all necessary hardware. Handcrafted in the USA.

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$88.99


 
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